Saturday, 5 August 2017

Most Successful Star Trek Movies

It has been a while since my last post but in anticipation of the new Star Trek show Discovery I thought a brief overview over the box office successes of the Star Trek franchise might be a fun read.

The Movies

Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Released December 7th, 1979 and directed by Robert Wise, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the third-worst and by Metacritic as the second-worst of the series. I personally liked the movie for its actual continuation of the boldy go where no man has gone before theme and especially liked its slow pace. Well, and its Director’s Cut has been indeed an improvement.

Domestic Box Office: $82,258,456
Worldwide Box Office: $139,000,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $283,480,334
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $479,000,000

Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan

Released June 4, 1982 and directed by Nicholas Meyer, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the third-best and by Metacritic as the fourth-best of the series. Fun and fast-paced with a great Ricardo Montalban.

Domestic Box Office: $78,912,963
Worldwide Box Office: $95,800,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $232,175,887
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $282,000,000

Star Trek: The Search for Spock

Released June 1, 1984 and directed by Leonard Nimoy, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the sixth-worst and by Metacritic as the fourth-worst of the series. Any scene with the crew is among the best but anything is of little interest, Christopher Lloyd notwithstanding.

Domestic Box Office: $76,471,046
Worldwide Box Office: $87,000,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $196,867,417
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $224,000,000

Star Trek: Voyage Home

Released November 26, 1986 and directed by Leonard Nimoy, considered both by Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic as the sixth-best of the series. A crowd-pleaser and the first with a message.

Domestic Box Office: $109,713,132
Worldwide Box Office: $133,000,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $252,717,820
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $306,000,000

Star Trek: The Final Frontier

Released June 9, 1989 and directed by William Shatner, considered both by Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic as the worst of the series. While it has its share of desastrous ideas, to me it is on par with The Undiscovered Country. The Final Frontier was the better Star Trek movie while The Undiscovered Country is the better movie.

Domestic Box Office:$52,210,049
Worldwide Box Office: $70,200,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $113,187,196
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $152,000,000

Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country

Released December 6, 1991 and directed by Nicholas Meyer, considered both by Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic as the seventh-best/worst of the series. It has a great story, excellent effects and other production values, but it sucks in dialogue and so many small details, that it makes me cringe even thinking about it. (But I want that phaser Valeris shot in the kitchen. Imagine shooting at Deanna and only her uniform disappears!)

Domestic Box Office: $74,888,996
Worldwide Box Office: $96,900,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $153,992,542
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $199,000,000

Star Trek: Generations

Released November 18, 1994 and directed by David Carson, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the fourth-worst and by Metacritic as the fifth-worst of the series. It was cool to finally see the crew of the Enterprise-D on the big screen but its story was awful and would have been a mediocre filler episode on the show.

Domestic Box Office: $75,671,262
Worldwide Box Office: $120,000,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $159,875,563
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $254,000,000

Star Trek: First Contact

Released November 22, 1996 and directed by Jonathan Frakes, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the second-best and by Metacritic as the third-best of the series. My favorite movies in the series, with a good story, a frightening villain, great ideas abound etc. etc.

Domestic Box Office: $92,027,888
Worldwide Box Office: $150,000,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $179,893,955
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $293,000,000

Star Trek: Insurrection

Released December 11, 1998 and directed by Jonathan Frakes, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the fifth-worst and by Metacritic as the sixth-worst of the series. Insurrection shares the same problems with Generations, notably its mediocrity, but with a better director.

Domestic Box Office: $70,187,658
Worldwide Box Office: $117,800,000
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $127,817,512
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $215,000,000

Star Trek: Nemesis

Released December 13, 2002 and directed by Stuart Baird, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the second-worst and by Metacritic as the third-worst of the series. To me Nemesis was the nadir of the series: a movie made for money, for ego, for contractual obligations (whatever) - without any heart at all, by the numbers.

Domestic Box Office: $43,254,409
Worldwide Box Office: $67,312,826
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $64,211,450
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $100,000,000

Star Trek

Released May 8, 2009 and directed by J.J. Abrams, considered both by Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic as the best of the series. A good cast and beautiful cameo by Leonard Nimoy can not make up for a bad script and even worse direction. But its success breathed life into the franchise.

Domestic Box Office: $257,730,019
Worldwide Box Office: $385,680,446
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $297,248,626
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $445,000,000

Star Trek Into Darkness

Released May 16, 2013 and directed by J.J. Abrams, considered by Rotten Tomatoes as the fourth-best and by Metacritic as the second-best of the series. A huge improvement over its predecessor, enjoyable. But I still don’t like J.J. Abrams as a director.

Domestic Box Office: $228,778,661
Worldwide Box Office: $467,381,584
Inflation Adjusted Domestic Box Office: $243,411,484
Inflation Adjusted Worldwide Box Office: $497,000,000

Star Trek Beyond

Released July 22, 2016 and directed by Justin Lin, considered both by Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic as the fifth-best of the series. What it lacks in a good villain it more than makes up by a better director.

Domestic Box Office: $158,848,340
Worldwide Box Office: $336,398,312
Not yet inflation adjusted.

The Verdict

Looking at the box office globally and inflation adjusted you get Star Trek Into Darkness as the winner with almost half a billion dollars in today’s money, closely followed by Star Trek: The Motion Picture with only 18 million dollars less. Star Trek’s 2009 reboot comes third. The remaining list (from highest to lowest global box office results) is as follows: Star Trek Beyond, Star Trek: The Voyage Home, Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek: The Search for Spock, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, Star Trek: The Final Frontier, and Star Trek: Nemesis. Adjusted for inflation the average worldwide box office per movie is about 291 million dollars.

Domestically the 2009 reboot (Star Trek) takes the top spot with almost 300 million of today’s dollars, followed by Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Star Trek: The Voyage Home on second and third places, respectively. The remaining list (from highest to lowest domestic box office results) is as follows: Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek: The Search for Spock, Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek Beyond, Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: The Final Frontier, and Star Trek: Nemesis. Adjusted for inflation the average domestic box office per movie is about 190 million dollars.

What is noteworthy for any analysis of Star Trek’s box office history is the fact that the early movies played mostly to an audience in North America which is most remarkable for Star Trek: The Search for Spock: only 12% of its global box office came from international markets while Star Trek Into Darkness and Star Trek Beyond took 51% and 53% of its box office from international markets.

As for its critical appreciation I turn to Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic: both agree on Star Trek (2009) as the best movie in the series, followed by Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek Beyond, Star Trek: The Voyage Home, Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, Star Trek: The Search for Spock, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek: Nemesis, and with Star Trek: The Final Frontier as the worst Star Trek movie ever, something both websites agree upon as well.

The Internet Movie Database is a good source for the public appreciation: IMDb’s voters agree with the critics and like Star Trek (2009) best, followed by Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek: First Contact, Star Trek: The Voyage Home, Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, Star Trek Beyond, Star Trek: The Search for Spock, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek: Nemesis, Star Trek: Insurrection, and with Star Trek: The Final Frontier as the least liked.

And finally here’s my personal ranking of appreciation: my favorite is Star Trek: First Contact, followed by Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek: The Voyage Home, Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek Beyond, Star Trek: The Search for Spock, Star Trek: Generations, Star Trek: The Final Frontier, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, Star Trek (2009), and Star Trek: Nemesis.

Sources:
The Internet Movie Database - TMP, WOK, SFS, TVH, TFF, TUC, GEN, FCO, INS, NEM, STR, IDA, and BEY. © 1990-2017 IMDb.com, Inc. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
The Numbers Star Trek - TMP, WOK, SFS, TVH, TFF, TUC, GEN, FCO, INS, NEM, STR, IDA, and BEY. © 1997-2017 Nash Information Services, LLC. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
Wikipedia - Star Trek film series. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.. Retrieved 5 August 2017.

Saturday, 5 November 2016

Sex Education: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Maybe not as news worthy as the U.S. elections or Near East wars but timeless and more useful information for anyone un-Sex.Ed-ucated (like Catholic clergy, Muslim "freedom" fighters, Methodists and so on).



Saturday, 15 February 2014

Werner Ruhner: Friedrich Wolfs Bummi


Ihr könnt das Buch u.a. auf Amazon.de kaufen.

Wednesday, 1 January 2014

Vangelis Papathanassiou's La fête sauvage - a Proposition

Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου - better known as Vangelis - has composed a lot of music but kinda cared little to let people hear it. A lot of his music is still unreleased or only available in bootlegged or incidental formats. Most part of his Blade Runner soundtrack can only be heard on the various bootlegs while some other scores can only be heard in the background of the scored work.

And there is the fact that some music has never been properly cued in optical disc authoring. Heaven and Hell has easily recognizable parts, and some have been featured as such on compilation albums, but the album itself is only ever split into two tracks (and occasionally three) instead of the 9 that would be necessary.

Now there will be those (including to all likelihood Vangelis himself) saying that this is the way the music was intended to be listened to. But I personally find that in the time and age of music that plays on computers with dynamic and random playlists I often prefer a short piece of music instead of the whole 15 to 20 minutes of a vinyl side. One can still listen to the whole album if your in the mood…

Anyway, I though it might be a good thing to propose a way to split the albums into its parts. I use to whole disc image (as a single Wave file) with a cuesheet and have then altered the cuesheet. La fête sauvage is the first that I will treat this way.



La fête sauvage is the score to a French wildlife documentary by Frédéric Rossif. The album was originally published in 1976 and has since seen numerous reissues on CD, either with a single tracks or split into two tracks representing both sides of the original vinyl.

Here is my proposed cuesheet of the album, based on the 1995 issue by Polydor:

REM COMMENT "proposed split"
CATALOG 0042284119825
PERFORMER "Vangelis"
TITLE "La Fête sauvage"
FILE "Vangelis - La Fête sauvage.wav" WAVE
  TRACK 01 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage I: 1st Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 00 00:00:00
    INDEX 01 00:00:33
  TRACK 02 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage I: 2nd Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 02:28:25
  TRACK 03 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage I: 3rd Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 08:42:48
  TRACK 04 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage I: 4th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 11:52:47
  TRACK 05 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage I: 5th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 15:24:18
  TRACK 06 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 1st Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 18:13:24
  TRACK 07 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 2nd Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 20:29:67
  TRACK 08 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 3rd Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 24:41:01
  TRACK 09 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 4th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 26:48:71
  TRACK 10 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 5th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 31:21:18
  TRACK 11 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 6th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 33:01:47
  TRACK 12 AUDIO
    TITLE "La Fête sauvage II: 7th Movement"
    PERFORMER "Vangelis"
    INDEX 01 34:38:33


I hope that you will find it useful or at least interesting. I retained the original two parts as a starting point.

In case you want to buy the album you may find it on Amazon.fr, Amazon.de or Amazon.co.uk. And for whatever reason you want another alternative - try MusicStack.

Wednesday, 12 June 2013

Musical Taste // Favorites

Today's post may be of little interest to you… it's some ego cajolement about my musical taste.



Above are two tag clouds displaying the covers of my most listened albums[1]. The first one (above or left) has been taken over the past six and half years, the second one represents the top of the past six months.

Top 40 Artists

The following list is the current top 40 list of my favorite artists for the past twelve months…

  1. Front Line Assembly
  2. Depeche Mode
  3. The Prodigy
  4. Spetsnaz
  5. Leæther Strip
  6. Stellardrone
  7. And One
  8. X-102
  9. Celestial Aeon Project
  10. Front 242
  11. David Arnold & Michael Price
  12. Vangelis
  13. Patenbrigade: Wolff
  14. Haujobb
  15. Rotersand
  16. Pendulum
  17. Assemblage 23
  18. Frank Klepacki
  19. Solar Fields
  20. Hyperwind
  21. Architect
  22. Funker Vogt
  23. Janne Hanhisuanto
  24. Bass Tandem
  25. The Chemical Brothers
  26. Absurd Minds
  27. Esther Garcia
  28. Aes Dana
  29. 8kHz Mono
  30. Patrick Gowers
  31. Spacetime Continuum
  32. Richard Wells
  33. klakast
  34. Harry Gregson-Williams
  35. Laibach
  36. Pet Shop Boys
  37. Mr. Oizo
  38. Covenant
  39. Klinik
  40. VNV Nation

Special mention of Project Pitchfork.

And the artist tag cloud of my all-time favorites:



[1] My Last.fm data analyzed using Last.fm Tools.

Tuesday, 11 June 2013

Greg Craven // How the World Ends

I admit I haven't been very active lately on Think Tank but occasionally you come across something that really adds to some public discussion.



The strong point is not its scientific accuracy, for it has none, but its simple yet powerful reasoning…

Give it look!